Latest Issue: Volume 17, Issue 1

Deliberation and Decision-Making Process in the Inter-American Court of Human Rights: Do Individual Opinions Matter?

By: Resende, Ranieri L. | May 4, 2019

The work is focused on the adjudicatory nature of the Inter-American Court of Human Rights and investigates its model of deliberation, considering three basic schemes: per curiam, seriatim and hybrid. In order to identify an institutional pattern, the importance of individual opinions is analyzed through the quantitative performance of each category of judge (ad hoc and regular), as well as each type of adjudicative activity (judgments and advisory opinions). The quantitative data is also useful to better understand the explicit assimilation of separate opinions to the core reasoning of future cases. As a result, it has been possible to identify relevant aspects applicable to the main problem of whether individual opinions really matter to the Inter-American Court’s decision-making process.

Navigating the Moral Minefields of Human Rights Advocacy in the Global South

By: Babcock, Sandra L. | May 3, 2019

Legal Rights, Real-World Consequences: The Ethics of Know Your Rights Efforts and Towards Improved Community Legal Education

By: Lupo, Brandi M. | May 3, 2019